LAURP Criminal Justice Reform Initiative

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014
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Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson on Monday, September 22 announced the appointment of retired LAPD Sargent Cheryl Dorsey, a 20 year veteran of the department, as Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Director of Criminal Justice Reform. She will promote constructive dialogue and partnerships with law enforcement agencies and District Attorneys, conduct on going public education and community engagement on methods for reducing police-minority community tensions, and host periodic leadership meetings between civil rights and community leaders, law enforcement and elected officials, and criminal justice reform advocates.

“Given the critical focus of policy makers, law enforcement, and civil rights leaders on criminal justice reform, the need is greater than ever to implement initiatives in this crucial area,” says Hutchinson, “Cheryl Dorsey through her unique years of experience in law enforcement and criminal justice reform issues as well as civil rights activism will insure a major impact on policy change.”

09 23 14 Cheryl Dorsey LAURP Criminal Justice Reform InitiativeAbout Cheryl Dorsey

Twenty Years LAPD field-related assignments, which included the gang unit the Community Resources against Street Hoodlums, narcotics, and vice assignments for all four bureaus of LAPD operations and stints in the Department of Justice, the Bureau of Investigations, and Narcotic Enforcement.

She is the recipient of  numerous commendations and accolades from her command staff.

The LAURP Criminal Justice Reform Initiative

1. Promote constructive dialogue and partnerships with law enforcement agencies and the District Attorneys

2. Conduct on going public education and community engagement on methods for reducing police-minority community tensions

3. Monitor criminal justice policies at the state and local level to insure the implementation of constructive methods for reducing both crime and issues police misconduct.

4. Build, empower and mobilize citizen engagement on safe communities and rehabilitative alternatives to mass incarceration.

5. Periodic leadership meetings between civil rights and community leaders, law enforcement and elected officials, and criminal justice reform advocates.

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Men of Color College Forum

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014
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The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable 
in Partnership with Wells Fargo
is a proud sponsor of this event and organization.
On March 14th men of color college graduates, activists and entrepreneurs from South L.A. will join students from the Young Male Scholars pilot to discuss the challenges of college access and success in an era of Black/Latino mass incarceration and school push-out policies:

Campaign for College OpportunityIn Silicon Valley, fount of American technological innovation, fewer than 25% of black and Latino students successfully complete Algebra. Moreover, only 20% of Latinos and 22% of African-Americans “graduate with passing grades in the courses that are required” for admission to UC and Cal State universities. 

Education Trust West“Only one of every 20 African American kindergartners will graduate from a four-year California university if (these) current trends continue.”

Inside Higher Education“In 2012 only 75 Black males enrolled at UCLA. UCLA currently has more NCAA championships than African American male students”

March 14, 2014, 10:00 am
Gardena High School Library

1301 W. 182nd Street, Gardena, CA
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At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award to the Young Males Scholars’ Program at Gardena High

Thursday, March 6th, 2014
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LAUPR logo2 At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award to the Young Males Scholars Program at Gardena High

 

 

 

March 7, 2014
for Immediate Release
Contact: Debbie Washington

909-214-5844

03 06 2014 At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award to the Young Males Scholars Program at Gardena High

 

Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Announces

 At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award to the Young Males Scholars’ Program at Gardena High

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable announced the presentation of its At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award to the Young Male Scholars Program at Gardena High School on Friday, March 7. The At Risk Youth Uplift Project Award aims to support organizations and individuals that have a proven track record of commitment in providing services for youth including truancy prevention, literacy and academic assistance, behavioral interventions and counseling, mentoring, juvenile justice system diversions and restorative justice, after school activities, career exploration and life skills classes, and emergency youth shelter.

The Young Male Scholars’ program is designed to pipeline high school age young men of color into four year colleges and universities by providing them with college preparation, mentoring, self-esteem/cultural identity and leadership development resources.  Beginning in 9th grade, the program specifically targets African American males who are under-represented in the four year college-going, Advanced Placement and Gifted populations in South Los Angeles high schools.

“The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable also seeks and encourages donors to support the At Risk Youth Project. Your tax deductible contribution will enable us to expand the number of organizations and programs we give to that address the many challenges facing at risk youth in our communities, “says Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson.

Donate at website: http://www.laupr.org/

Information 909-214-5844

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Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Awards Community Service Honorees

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014
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Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Awards Special Edition 1964 Civil Rights Act Pure Silver Coin to Community Service Honorees

02 18 141 1024x764 Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Awards Community Service Honorees

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable announced its Community Service Awards at a special awards presentation ceremony on Sunday, February 16. The awards were presented to ten individuals, Pedro Baez, Sikivu Hutchinson Debbie Washington, Yvonne Divans, Barbara Bramwell, Josefina Culton. Dwayne Wyatt, Fanon Hutchinson, Najee Ali, Angela Hoffman, who performed dedicated service to the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable as well as being actively engaged in a variety of community improvement projects.

The awards were limited issue special edition commemorative pure silver coins from the United States Mint that marks the fiftieth anniversary of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964. The awards are treasured keepsakes that denote not only the service contributions of the award recipients but the enduring impact of the1964 Civil Rights Act on America. The United Negro College Fund received a portion of the proceeds from the awarding of the commemorative coins.

“The award recipients have demonstrated by their efforts and actions total dedication to the mission and mandate of the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable, which is,” says Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson, ”To build community sustainability in under-served communities that furthers further community self-reliance and independence.”

Wells Fargo Foundation is a major partner with the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable’s Impact Micro Award Program.

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The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Sponsored Minority Student Doctors Club Project

Thursday, January 30th, 2014
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The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Sponsored Minority Doctors Club Project is a direct response to the need to increase the number of minority physicians and health professionals to better reflect the needs of the nation’s diverse society. At present, approximately 9 percent of U.S. physicians are Hispanic, American Indian, African-American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian or from other groups historically underrepresented in the medical profession. While 1 in 8 Americans is African American, only 1 in 15 doctors are. And though 1 in 6 Americans identifies as Hispanic/Latino, only 1 in 20 doctors does. (For more detailed diversity data, check out the 2010 U.S. Census and the American Medical Association’s Diversity in the Physician Workforce: Facts and Figures 2010.)

Studies have documented the role of physician diversity in:

  • Increasing access for underserved populations
  • Increasing patient satisfaction
  • Ensuring  professional medical and health care

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable’s Minority Student Doctors Club Project encourages diversity in medicine and rewards student commitment to the elimination of healthcare disparities, outstanding academic achievements, leadership activities and community involvement in the health care profession. The initial program is based at the Wisdom Academy for Young Scientists that operates three charter schools in South Los Angeles.

Specifically, the Project focuses on:

  • Improving general student participants study skills,
  • Improving standardized test taking skills and science preparation
  • Establishing pipeline programs to secondary schools such as Charles Drew Medical Magnet that emphasize and prepare secondary education students for health and medical careers
  • Promoting age appropriate, cross-cultural competence and experiences in the health and medical fields. This means specifically tracking. Monitoring , and encouraging participation in community health fairs, providing intern assistance at community medical facilities, and on-going attendance and participation in medical science and health related workshops, meetings, and workshops in and away from school.
  • Expand the number of Doctors Clubs at charter and public schools in underserved minority communities in Los Angeles and other cities.

The Project provides funds and support to encourage student participants in their reading and science and health awareness and skills and funds the purchase of audio visual aids, books, manuals, assorted study materials, travel, and health fair costs.

• Provide funds and support to ensure that classes are taken to foster future career goals that aid the student participant in applying for a pre-med program or health care training program.

• Provide funds and support for assorted audio visual aids, books and materials as well as travel to medical institutions for the student participants to instill in them the idea of becoming a doctor or other health care professional.

• Provide funds and support for tutoring and specialized help in math and science. These skills will be important for future pre-med classes and the building blocks of these subjects will be important as classes become more challenging.

• Provide funds and support to help sharpen study habits and skills that aid student participants in dealing with challenging courses in health and science.

• Provide funds and support for prescribed observational periods when the student participants interact with doctors, nurses, health care technicians and other health professionals at clinics, hospitals and other medical institutional settings as well as during visits to their schools so they are able to learn and study first hand and most importantly develop hands on experience in the nuts and bolts of the medical and health care training field.

The measurement criteria are objective methods by which to identify, gauge and assess:

  • The program objectives in measurable terms
  • The key indicators of success
  • Provide data collection and analysis activities
  • Aid in developing a timeline to monitor the success of the program on an ongoing basis.

The Crucial Importance of Diversity in the Health Care Field

The View of the nation’s Leading Minority Doctors and Health Care Professionals

 

  • To serve those who need it most: Underrepresented minorities are more likely to go back and serve in their communities. This means more physicians are treating populations that are traditionally underserved in medicine. Our country has a discouraging history of not being able to make care accessible to minority groups — whether it’s because of lack of insurance, limited physical access (such as not having a clinic nearby, inadequate transportation, limited time), or even racism. It’s important to put physicians into communities who need care.
  • To encourage a sense of affinity: There’s research on how patients respond to physicians with whom they feel some concordance — whether it’s culture, race, language, gender. Conversations are more patient-centered; the patients ask more questions and more data about what’s actually bothering them can be extracted, leading to better outcomes.
  • To offer cultural understanding: We know that different cultures have different belief systems around health. While it’s not necessarily true that all people from one culture think the same thing, it’s reasonable to assume that, if you as the patient feel affinity with your doctor and you feel safe and you don’t feel judged, there might be more connection.
  • To enhance the field of medicine overall: Imagine you have a room with five people who are exactly the same — conversation is limited. But if you have five people who are entirely different, you’re going to encourage much greater learning. All five will leave the room with a much broader understanding. The population we serve is diverse. In order for all of us to leave our education, our grand rounds, our office, with a broader understanding of how to approach our patients, we need our colleagues to reflect our population.

Research has shown that minority doctors and health care professionals are more likely to work with underserved and indigent populations (for a summary table, see pages 2-3 of the Commonwealth Fund’s report on disparities). These are the same populations who bear disproportionate rates of disease and who have the most limited access to care. (For more, see the CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report.)

Finally, a study published in JAMA found that the more underrepresented minorities there are in a medical school’s student body, the more likely it is that students from that medical school (regardless of their own race) will “rate themselves as highly prepared to care for minority populations.”

What the Future Holds

Finally, in 2050, according to projections by The Pew Research Center, the U.S. will look much different by that time: more than half of Americans will be people of color. As our population increasingly diversifies, so too should our medical workforce.

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Impact Micro Award for Forgotten Harvest by Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable

Sunday, November 3rd, 2013
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LAUPR logo1 Impact Micro Award for Forgotten Harvest by Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable

 

 

 

8703 LaTijera Bl. Suite 211

L.A. 90045

323-383-6145

November 4, 2013

 

Mr. David Nicholson
Forgotten Harvest

21800 Greenfield Rd.

Oak Park 48237

Dear Mr. Nicholson:

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable is pleased to award Forgotten Harvest an Impact Micro Award. Your organization has shown by its work and example an unswerving dedication to building community self- sustainability. The Impact Micro Award to Forgotten Harvest will be spotlighted on the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable website: http://laurp.com

We request that you announce the receipt of the award on your website, through your email list, newsletter, or a testimonial. We find promoting the receipt of the award spurs other potential donors and funders to donate to your department.

Sincerely,

Earl Ofari Hutchinson

President Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable 

Forgotten Harvest Impact Micro Award for Forgotten Harvest by Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable

 

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Building Self-Sustaining Communities Project October Impact Awards to Three Projects

Sunday, September 29th, 2013
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LAUPR logo Building Self Sustaining Communities Project October Impact Awards to Three Projects

 

 

 

 

October 1, 2013
for Immediate Release
Contact: Debbie Washington

909-214-5844

 

09 29 2013 Building Self Sustaining Communities Project October Impact Awards to Three Projects

 

Building Self-Sustaining Communities Project

October Impact Awards to Three Projects

 

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable announced its Impact Awards for October on Tuesday, October 1. The October awards are part of its Building Self-Sustaining Communities Project. The Project supports organizations and individuals working in Los Angeles County and  underserved communities in other cities. In October, we selected The Fatherhood 101 Project of Cincinnati, Ohio, the Los Angeles Youth Orchestra, and the Doors to Heaven Indigent Bereaved Support Project. These organizations have a proven track record of commitment to building community sustainability projects, activities, and service. The awards are given monthly.

“Budget cutbacks, the sharp increase in poverty, and the on-going struggle of small community service groups for funding have made it more imperative that we help fill the funding gap to boost them in their efforts to build community sustainability in under-served communities,” says Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson, “The Building Self-Sustaining Communities Award Program aims to further community self-reliance and independence. This is the pathway to citizen empowerment.”

Wells Fargo Foundation is a major partner with the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable’s Impact Micro Award Program.

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable will make its next Building Self-Sustaining Communities Awards in November. Information and nominations for the Awards

Information: 909-214-5844

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Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca Will Join March on Washington Commemoration Stand-In for Jobs and Freedom

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013
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Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable

 August 27, 2013

For Immediate Release

Contact:

Pedro Baez

424-239-0097

 

Press Conference/ March on Washington Stand-In:

When: Wednesday, August 28, 3:30 PM

Where: Celes King Civil Rights Monument-Freedom Square–on the corner of Crenshaw and King Blvds., LA 90008

 

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca Will Join March on Washington Commemoration Stand-In for Jobs and Freedom

Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson announced that L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca will join community residents and leaders in the 50th Anniversary March on Washington Stand-In for Jobs and Freedom on Wednesday, August 28 from 3:30 to 4:00 PM. It will be held at the Celes King Civil Rights Monument-Freedom Square–on the corner of Crenshaw and King Blvds. The Stand-In will challenge 50 Los Angeles employers to take the “Freedom at 50 Jobs Pledge.” The pledge is to hire at least one minority employee to commemorate the 1963 March on Washington.

 

“Sheriff Baca and other officials participation in the March on Washington stand-n for Jobs and Freedom,” says Hutchinson,” Sends the strong signal that L.A. officials support the continuing fight for jobs, equality and civil rights.”

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Freedom at 50 Day Resolution

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013
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At the Wednesday August 21, Los Angeles City Council meeting, Los Angeles City Councilman Bernard Parks presented to the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable a resolution it pushed to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington.000 8 22 march on washington reso Freedom at 50 Day Resolution
Left to right: Councilmembers Joe Buscaino, Curren Price Jr., Earl Ofari Hutchinson of the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable, Councilmember Parks, and Pedro Baez and Michelle Richardson of the Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable

Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson also urged the city council to back the Roundtable’s call for at least 50 Los Angeles employers to take the “Freedom at 50 Jobs Pledge.” The pledge is to hire at least one minority employee to commemorate the 1963 March on Washington.

The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable will hold a “Freedom at 50 Jobs and Freedom” stand-in at the Celes King Civil Rights Monument, at “Freedom Square”,  located at King Blvd and Crenshaw Blvd at the exact time and day,Wednesday August 28, at 3:30 p.m. that the 1963 March on Washington was held.  I welcome you all to join and take part in history.

LA Urban Policy Roundtable Video Presentation Begins at 34:00 Minute Mark
Click the link for the presentation and to learn more about the meaning of the resolution -
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Rights Leaders Challenged on Lane Murder

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013
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Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari Hutchinson will challenge other civil right leaders to publicly condemn the murder of East Central University baseball player Christopher Lane allegedly by  James Francis Edwards Jr., 15, Michael Dewayne Jones, 17, and Chancey Allen Luna, 16, all of Duncan, Okla.

Hutchinson will publicly announce on Friday, August 23, on his weekly radio show, The Hutchinson Report, on KTYM-Radio, at 9:00 AM that his organization, The Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable, will make a donation directly to the support fund established to aid the family of Chris Lane. He will publicly urge other civil rights leaders to not only speak out but also contribute to the Lane family support fund, says Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable Vice President Pedro Baez.

The Australian Consul General in Los Angeles has been invited to speak out on The Hutchinson Report.

“This was a heinous murder irrespective of color. And this makes it even more compelling for civil rights leaders to publicly condemn the killing, no matter who the victim is or the alleged perpetrators are,” says Hutchinson, “This is even more urgent given a recent report that one of the alleged shooters posted anti-white tweets.”

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